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China Wants to Go Green: Sustainability Imperatives for CHROs of Multinationals


March 2015 | Publication

Chief human resources officers of multinational corporations operating in China have a triumvirate of challenges ahead in the immediate future: the war for talent, slow economic growth, and now stricter laws on environmental effects of operations. This will require hiring leaders with a special skill set, one that will not be easy to find locally given how fast not only the Chinese economy grew but environmental damage grew alongside it.

MNCs have an important role to play in shaping China's environmental future, and the stakes are high for business: meet the higher government standards, pay an appropriate share of the cost of pollution, and meet the expectations of the increasingly vocal Chinese populace on sustainability issues—or pay the price in reputation, brand, and fines. Chief human resources officers will have to create a unique employee value proposition to stay ahead of the curve.

Explore our full portfolio of thought leadership on China Sustainability here.



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AUTHORS

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Anke Schrader

Senior Researcher
China Center for Economics and Business

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Minji Xie

Research Analyst
China Center for Economics and Business

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Melinda Zhang

Research Analyst
China Center for Economics and Business

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Anke Schrader

Senior Researcher

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Thomas Singer

Principal Researcher

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