Human Capital Management Blogs

Builds and manages workforce based on organizational goals, budget considerations, and staffing needs. Ensures that employees are appropriately recruited, selected, appraised, and rewarded; takes action to address performance problems. Manages a multi-sector workforce and a variety of work situations.


2017

  1. How Leaders Can Push Employees Without Stressing Them Out
    One of the most interesting findings of a recent HBR article on team chemistry is that the types of people who become leaders within organizations are about 30% less likely than their coworkers to feel stressed out. As the CEO of a small investment firm, I was surprised by the finding, but as I considered my own leadership style and intraoffice relationships, I concluded that the authors were onto something. Plus, a finding from a 20,000-person survey is probably worth paying attention to.
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

  2. To Hire Great Coders, Offer Learning, Not Just Money
    From data scientists to web developers to designers, firms are locked in competition for technical talent. You can’t compete with the likes of Google and Facebook without coders, but if you’re not Google or Facebook, it often seems, you can’t afford them.
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

  3. What Matters More to Your Workforce than Money
    Economists have long argued that money doesn’t buy happiness. But compensation is still a major factor for us when we’re considering where to work. What do we know about how more pay influences employees’ motivations?
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

  4. What If Companies Managed People as Carefully as They Manage Money?
    In contrast, today’s scarcest resource is your human capital, as measured by the time, talent and energy of your workforce. Time, whether measured by hours in a day or days in a career, is finite. Difference-making talent is also scarce. The average company considers only about 15% of its employees to be difference makers. Finding, developing, and retaining this talent is hard — so much so that the business press refers to a “war” for talent.
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

  5. Your Team’s Time Management Problem Might Be a Focus Problem
    “My team has a time management problem,” leaders often tell me. For example, an executive might say that their teams aren’t moving the needle on important projects, yet staffers seem busy and stressed. “Time management” becomes a catchall solution to this problem, and they want to hire me to offer tips and techniques on things like prioritizing and using their calendars better.
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

  6. 3 Popular Goal-Setting Techniques Managers Should Avoid
    So the argument for strategic goal setting seemed settled. Set specific, difficult goals with tight deadlines. Don’t be too concerned about whether the goal is jointly set by the individual and manager together, or whether the boss just hands the subordinate the list of goals he expects the subordinate to achieve together with a tough due-date. Let everybody know what your goals are. The predictable result: Increased effort, greater persistence, and better performance.
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

  7. Evidence That Minorities Perform Worse Under Biased Managers
    There is a growing body of research showing that minorities face bias in the job application process. When identical resumes — one with the name Emily and one with the name Lakisha, for example — are sent to job openings, Emily’s resume gets substantially more callbacks. And even with the same credentials as other candidates, minorities are less likely to be hired.
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

  8. How Managers Can Make Group Projects More Efficient
    As a manager or team leader, how do you reap the benefits of effective collaboration without inviting inefficiencies and messiness?
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

  9. How to Work for a Gossipy Boss
    It’s a given that you want your boss’s trust. But what if your boss shares things he shouldn’t, trusting that you will be more discreet than he? Maybe he tells you information you shouldn’t know about your peers. Or he gossips about people in other departments. What should you do when your boss is indiscreet? Is there a way to call out unprofessional comments and behavior without risking your relationship — or your job? At what point should you involve your boss’s boss or HR?
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

  10. 7 Tricky Work Situations, and How to Respond to Them
    You know the moment: a mood-veering, thought-steering, pressure-packed interaction with a colleague, boss, or client where the right thing to say is stuck in a verbal traffic jam between your brain and your mouth.
    (Human Capital Blog, October 2017)

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