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02 Oct. 2014 | Comments (0)

When Fortune 500 companies are performing weakly, white women and people of color are more likely than white men to be promoted to CEO, say Alison Cook and Christy Glass of Utah State University. But if these leaders’ tenure is marked by declining performance, they are likely to be replaced by white men, a phenomenon the researchers term the “savior effect.” In only 4 of 608 transitions over 14 years was a woman or minority appointee succeeded by another woman or minority CEO.

SOURCE:  Above the Glass Ceiling: When Are Women and Racial/Ethnic Minorities Promoted to CEO?

 

This blog first appeared on Harvard Business Review on 6/26/2014.

View our complete listing of Strategic HR, Leadership Development and Diversity & Inclusion blogs.

     

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