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14 Jul. 2014 | Comments (0)

Providing employees with a social “mission” in their jobs doesn’t increase their effort: In an experiment in which workers could generate donations to NGOs of their choice, people whose jobs had a mission made no more effort than purely self-interested workers, say Sebastian Fehrler of the University of Zurich and Michael Kosfeld of Goethe University Frankfurt. However, there’s a subgroup of workers who choose mission-oriented jobs, and these workers tend to be more motivated. If you’re a mission-driven company, you can screen for them by offering low salaries, the researchers say.

SOURCE:  Pro-social missions and worker motivation: An experimental study

 

This blog first appeared on Harvard Business Review on 5/02/2014.

View our complete listing of Mission&Purpose@Work and Compensation and Benefits blogs.

     

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