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Scott Healy

Consultant
Gagen MacDonald

Scott Healy

Scott Healy applies principles of community design to companies at a crossroads, helping clients motivate teams by discovering opportunities for employees to identify personally with an overarching business strategy. Scott Healy brings more than ten years of experience in executive management, resource planning, brand strategy and economic development. Prior to joining Gagen MacDonald, Scott was the CEO of one of Connecticut’s largest business improvement districts, a public-private partnership designed to revitalize downtown New Haven. While there, he pursued innovative, consensus-driven strategies to grow a fledgling operation into a dynamic agency widely credited with rejuvenating a moribund city center. Scott’s work in urban development sparked a passion for building communities—not just appealing stores and restaurants, but conceptual neighborhoods that arise when people connect to a cause bigger than themselves. After working with New Haven business owners to increase their customer base, he also recognized that building a company is a lot like building a city: it requires patience for divergent opinions, comfortable places to meet and share ideas, understandable blueprints for new projects, and dense communications networks connecting employees, leaders, suppliers and customers. At Gagen MacDonald, Scott applies these principles of community design to organizations, helping clients motivate teams by discovering opportunities for employees to identify personally with an overarching business strategy. Scott’s writing on urban design, perception/reality alignment and community development has appeared in numerous print and online publications. Outside the office, he enjoys traveling, a capella singing, Chicago beach volleyball and short story writing. He’s also an experienced graphic designer with a passion for architectural history and quirky urban design. He received a B.A. in Ethics, Politics and Economics from Yale University, and an MBA from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody. Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities